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Lira localizada en el Cementerio real de Ur.

Lira localizada en el Cementerio real de Ur.

Lira localizada en el Cementerio real de Ur. Representaciones zoomórficas situadas bajo el prótomo de toro.

Lira localizada en el Cementerio real de Ur. Representaciones zoomórficas situadas bajo el prótomo de toro.

Intérprete de lira, posíblemente ciego.

Intérprete de lira, posíblemente ciego.

Estandarte real de Ur. Esquina superior derecha del lado de la celebración.

Estandarte real de Ur. Esquina superior derecha del lado de la celebración.

Weapons from The Royal Tombs of Ur

Weapons from The Royal Tombs of Ur

Sumerian necklaces. Jewelry from The Royal Tombs of Ur.

Sumerian necklaces. Jewelry from The Royal Tombs of Ur.

Una de las mayores revoluciones artísticas del Arte Egipcio: Intérpretes situadas frontalmente, no de perfil.

Una de las mayores revoluciones artísticas del Arte Egipcio: Intérpretes situadas frontalmente, no de perfil.

Queen Pu-abi: When she was found 4,500 years after she was buried, she was still wearing this elaborate headdress, and the entire upper portion of her body was covered in jewelry.  Jewelry from The Royal Tombs of Ur

Queen Pu-abi: When she was found 4,500 years after she was buried, she was still wearing this elaborate headdress, and the entire upper portion of her body was covered in jewelry. Jewelry from The Royal Tombs of Ur

Queen’s Treasures, Nimrud    The Royal Tombs of Nimrud, in Syria, were first discovered in 1989 by an expedition of the Iraqi Department of Antiquities and Heritage. Amongst their spectacular discoveries was an assortment of jewellery and personal items including the fabulous tiara belonging to Queen Yaba, wife of King Tiglath-Pileser III, who ruled from c.744-727 BC. Found  in Queen Yaba’s tomb in the north-west palace, the intricate gold tiara depicts flowers and mythical winged beasts in…

Queen’s Treasures, Nimrud The Royal Tombs of Nimrud, in Syria, were first discovered in 1989 by an expedition of the Iraqi Department of Antiquities and Heritage. Amongst their spectacular discoveries was an assortment of jewellery and personal items including the fabulous tiara belonging to Queen Yaba, wife of King Tiglath-Pileser III, who ruled from c.744-727 BC. Found in Queen Yaba’s tomb in the north-west palace, the intricate gold tiara depicts flowers and mythical winged beasts in…

Vessel stand with ibex support.  Period:  Early Dynastic III  Date: ca. 2600–2350 B.C.  Geography:   Mesopotamia, IRAQ  Culture:  Sumerian

Vessel stand with ibex support. Period: Early Dynastic III Date: ca. 2600–2350 B.C. Geography: Mesopotamia, IRAQ Culture: Sumerian

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