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Resultado de imagem para peste negra

Resultado de imagem para peste negra

In sixteenth- and seventeenth-century London, in response to recurrent epidemics of bubonic plague, authorities instituted the tradition of publishing a Bill of Mortality each week. The “Great Plague of London,” which hit the city in the summer of 1665, is estimated to have killed between 75,000 and 100,000 Londoners. This page represents the death tally of all city parishes for the week of August 15-22, 1665, when the plague had infected ninety-six of the 130 parishes reporting.

How Londoners Died in One Plague-Ridden Week in 1665

In sixteenth- and seventeenth-century London, in response to recurrent epidemics of bubonic plague, authorities instituted the tradition of publishing a Bill of Mortality each week. The “Great Plague of London,” which hit the city in the summer of 1665, is estimated to have killed between 75,000 and 100,000 Londoners. This page represents the death tally of all city parishes for the week of August 15-22, 1665, when the plague had infected ninety-six of the 130 parishes reporting.

Doctor de la plaga Máscara

Plague Doctor Mask

Doctor de la plaga Máscara

Black Death European Tour.

Black Death European Tour.

Life and Times of the Bubonic Plague!

Life and Times of the Bubonic Plague!

medico della peste

medico della peste

Médicos de la Peste Negra

Médicos de la Peste Negra

te limita la máscara? Hacer es Hacerse

Plague Doctor's mask in brownish tan leather Classic

te limita la máscara? Hacer es Hacerse

The first outbreak of the Black Death reached England in 1348 through the Dorset port of Melcombe Regis, brought, it is thought, on an Italian merchant ship. Within a month of its arrival in Dorset, it had spread throughout the county and across to Devon and Somerset, reaching Bristol on August 15th. Citizens of Gloucester, the next large town north refused to allow anyone from Bristol to enter their city, believing that the disease spread on people's breath.

The first outbreak of the Black Death reached England in 1348 through the Dorset port of Melcombe Regis, brought, it is thought, on an Italian merchant ship. Within a month of its arrival in Dorset, it had spread throughout the county and across to Devon and Somerset, reaching Bristol on August 15th. Citizens of Gloucester, the next large town north refused to allow anyone from Bristol to enter their city, believing that the disease spread on people's breath.

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