Explora Divina Proporcion, La Divina, ¡y mucho más!

La Divina proporción - Carmen Bonell

La Divina proporción - Carmen Bonell

A labyrinth is not a maze, though the two terms are often used interchangeably in English. A maze has many paths, multiple entrances and exits, and has dead ends and traps. A maze is a game, a challenge. In contrast, a labyrinth has a single entrance and a single path that leads to the center. There is one path in/out of the labyrinth.

A labyrinth is not a maze, though the two terms are often used interchangeably in English. A maze has many paths, multiple entrances and exits, and has dead ends and traps. A maze is a game, a challenge. In contrast, a labyrinth has a single entrance and a single path that leads to the center. There is one path in/out of the labyrinth.

Luz.LabyrinthMMX-400 (318×400)

Luz.LabyrinthMMX-400 (318×400)

La Divina proporción - Carmen Bonell

La Divina proporción - Carmen Bonell

animales ilustraciones con diamantes - Google Search

animales ilustraciones con diamantes - Google Search

Wycinanki: The Art of Polish Paper Cuts by sallyboyle1, via Flickr

Wycinanki: The Art of Polish Paper Cuts by sallyboyle1, via Flickr

Miriam Badyrka is The Doodler: medallion doodles

Miriam Badyrka is The Doodler: medallion doodles

colorful mandalas - Buscar con Google

colorful mandalas - Buscar con Google

Google http://www.eveandersson.com/photos/morocco/marrakech-bahia-palace-pattern-6-large.jpg

Google http://www.eveandersson.com/photos/morocco/marrakech-bahia-palace-pattern-6-large.jpg

Maṇḍala is Sanskrit for “circle”, and is used in various ways by peoples in many parts of the world—especially Asia—as a representation of sacred wholeness or significance. The snake biting its own tail (Ouroboros) can be a maṇḍala (see Dayak Myths). Tibetan Buddhists (see Tibetan Buddhism) and North American relatives of central Asian cultures—for example, the Navajo Indians—use maṇḍalas in sand paintings, as part of curing or initiatory ceremonies. The maṇḍala in such cases is a…

Maṇḍala is Sanskrit for “circle”, and is used in various ways by peoples in many parts of the world—especially Asia—as a representation of sacred wholeness or significance. The snake biting its own tail (Ouroboros) can be a maṇḍala (see Dayak Myths). Tibetan Buddhists (see Tibetan Buddhism) and North American relatives of central Asian cultures—for example, the Navajo Indians—use maṇḍalas in sand paintings, as part of curing or initiatory ceremonies. The maṇḍala in such cases is a…

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