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ancientart:  Ancient Mesopotamian art, Standing Male Worshiper, currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

ancientart: Ancient Mesopotamian art, Standing Male Worshiper, currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

The Ishtar Gate or Lions Gate of Ancient Babylon, one of the best preserved ancient artifact in the world.

The Ishtar Gate or Lions Gate of Ancient Babylon, one of the best preserved ancient artifact in the world.

Human-headed winged lion (lamassu), 883–859 b.c.; Neo-Assyrian period, reign of Ashurnasirpal II  Excavated at Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Mesopotamia  Alabaster (gypsum)

Human-headed winged lion (lamassu), 883–859 b.c.; Neo-Assyrian period, reign of Ashurnasirpal II Excavated at Nimrud (ancient Kalhu), northern Mesopotamia Alabaster (gypsum)

Examples of Sumerian art found at the ancient site of Ur in Iraq.

Examples of Sumerian art found at the ancient site of Ur in Iraq.

Detail of the Sumerian lyre from the tombs in Sumerian city-state Ur, hometown of the Patriarch Abraham. British Museum

Detail of the Sumerian lyre from the tombs in Sumerian city-state Ur, hometown of the Patriarch Abraham. British Museum

Chapter 2. Mesopotamian Art, From C. 2000 to 330 BCplate 55.  The Worshipper of Larsa (7 3.4 x 5 3/4 in.), bronze, gold, and silver, from Larsa, beginning of the second millenium BC.  Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Chapter 2. Mesopotamian Art, From C. 2000 to 330 BCplate 55. The Worshipper of Larsa (7 3.4 x 5 3/4 in.), bronze, gold, and silver, from Larsa, beginning of the second millenium BC. Musée du Louvre, Paris.

Sumerian Bull Lyre, 713BC, Iraq     The Sumerians, including the city-state Ur, created some of the most exquisite art of their time, often for religious and funerary purposes. The Sumerian Bull Lyre is part of a group of objects discovered in the late 1920s by archaeologist C. Leonard Woolley, and is composed of gold, silver, lapis lazuli, shell, bitumen and wood. Archeological evidence indicates that lyres were played by both men and women.

Artifacts of the Royal Cemetery of Ur

Sumerian Bull Lyre, 713BC, Iraq The Sumerians, including the city-state Ur, created some of the most exquisite art of their time, often for religious and funerary purposes. The Sumerian Bull Lyre is part of a group of objects discovered in the late 1920s by archaeologist C. Leonard Woolley, and is composed of gold, silver, lapis lazuli, shell, bitumen and wood. Archeological evidence indicates that lyres were played by both men and women.

Main staircase of the Ziggurat of Ur

Main staircase of the Ziggurat of Ur

human headed winged bull from Khorsabad, Mesopotamia (16 feet tall!), that once stood in the throneroom of the palace of the Assyrian King Sargon II.

Kids Love Ancient Egypt and Archaeology

human headed winged bull from Khorsabad, Mesopotamia (16 feet tall!), that once stood in the throneroom of the palace of the Assyrian King Sargon II.

One of 18 Statues of Gudea, a ruler around 2090 BC

One of 18 Statues of Gudea, a ruler around 2090 BC

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