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Alberto Giacometti. Mujer degollada [Femme égorgée] (1933). Bronce. Vaciado de 1949 fundido por Alexis Rudier Edición 5/5, 22 x 87,5 x 53,5 cm. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edimburgo, Reino Unido

Alberto Giacometti. Mujer degollada [Femme égorgée] (1933). Bronce. Vaciado de 1949 fundido por Alexis Rudier Edición 5/5, 22 x 87,5 x 53,5 cm. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edimburgo, Reino Unido

milieu du siècle sculpture abstraite moderne par Jetsetretrodesign

milieu du siècle sculpture abstraite moderne par Jetsetretrodesign

Henry Moore, Working Model for Mother and Child: Hood  (LH vol 6, no.850)

Henry Moore, Working Model for Mother and Child: Hood (LH vol 6, no.850)

DAVID SMITH http://www.widewalls.ch/artist/david-smith/ #abstract #expressionism #sculpture - Ad Mare

DAVID SMITH http://www.widewalls.ch/artist/david-smith/ #abstract #expressionism #sculpture - Ad Mare

Phonolite stone Abstract Contemporary or Modern Outdoor Outside Exterior Garden / Yard Sculptures Statues statuary sculpture by artist Jonathan Mencarelli titled: 'Drop Team'

Phonolite stone Abstract Contemporary or Modern Outdoor Outside Exterior Garden / Yard Sculptures Statues statuary sculpture by artist Jonathan Mencarelli titled: 'Drop Team'

Mitsugu Sato

Mitsugu Sato

Personnage (1935) - Joan Miró

Personnage (1935) - Joan Miró

Moholy Nagy. Escultura de níquel, 1921.

Moholy Nagy. Escultura de níquel, 1921.

jean arp

jean arp

La Marseillaise by Rude (Romanticism). This is from one side of the Arc de Triomphe in France. It is an allegory of the national glories of revolutionary France. It depicts the Roman goddess of war (Bellona) soaring above the patriots and urging them on. The figures recall classical forms and the Roman armor on the front figure is especially reminiscent of the classical past. However, the violent motion and overlapping masses demonstrate the dramatic tendencies of Romanticism.

La Marseillaise by Rude (Romanticism). This is from one side of the Arc de Triomphe in France. It is an allegory of the national glories of revolutionary France. It depicts the Roman goddess of war (Bellona) soaring above the patriots and urging them on. The figures recall classical forms and the Roman armor on the front figure is especially reminiscent of the classical past. However, the violent motion and overlapping masses demonstrate the dramatic tendencies of Romanticism.

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