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Kelpie - A shape-shifting water fey in Scottish mythology, capable of appearing as a horse or a humanoid.  Often mistakenly thought to haunt lochs, Kelpies are actually traditionally supposed to be denizens of natural lakes and rivers.  They are dangerous.  Folktales tell of them appearing as beautiful horses wandering shores, seeming to invite people-- especially children-- to ride them.  Once a person climbs onto its back, a Kelpie will plunge into to water and drowns its prey.

Kelpie - A shape-shifting water fey in Scottish mythology, capable of appearing as a horse or a humanoid. Often mistakenly thought to haunt lochs, Kelpies are actually traditionally supposed to be denizens of natural lakes and rivers. They are dangerous. Folktales tell of them appearing as beautiful horses wandering shores, seeming to invite people-- especially children-- to ride them. Once a person climbs onto its back, a Kelpie will plunge into to water and drowns its prey.

Gorgeous. Power-full. Water of Life being drunk by the animal that gave us Freedom. :>O<:

Gorgeous. Power-full. Water of Life being drunk by the animal that gave us Freedom. :>O<:

Loch Lomond, stunning scenery, so calm and serene, this would definitely make me smile, I hope it does you too!

Loch Lomond, stunning scenery, so calm and serene, this would definitely make me smile, I hope it does you too!

Kelpie - A shape-shifting water fey in Scottish mythology, capable of appearing as a horse or a humanoid.  Often mistakenly thought to haunt lochs, Kelpies are actually traditionally supposed to be denizens of natural lakes and rivers.  They are dangerous.  Folktales tell of them appearing as beautiful horses wandering shores, seeming to invite people-- especially children-- to ride them.  Once a person climbs onto its back, a Kelpie will plunge into to water and drowns its prey.

Kelpie - A shape-shifting water fey in Scottish mythology, capable of appearing as a horse or a humanoid. Often mistakenly thought to haunt lochs, Kelpies are actually traditionally supposed to be denizens of natural lakes and rivers. They are dangerous. Folktales tell of them appearing as beautiful horses wandering shores, seeming to invite people-- especially children-- to ride them. Once a person climbs onto its back, a Kelpie will plunge into to water and drowns its prey.

Christmas Oar Decor. Featured on CC: http://www.completely-coastal.com/2014/11/coastal-christmas-wall-decor.html

Christmas Oar Decor. Featured on CC: http://www.completely-coastal.com/2014/11/coastal-christmas-wall-decor.html

Amazing Photo from the River Etive looking towards Buachaille Etive Mor, Glencoe, Scotland | 19 Reasons Why Scotland Must Be on Your Bucket List. Amazing no. #12

Amazing Photo from the River Etive looking towards Buachaille Etive Mor, Glencoe, Scotland | 19 Reasons Why Scotland Must Be on Your Bucket List. Amazing no. #12

Onic on the shores of Loch Linnhe, great place for a cuppa!

Onic on the shores of Loch Linnhe, great place for a cuppa!

A crannog is typically a partially or entirely artificial island, usually built in lakes, rivers and estuarine waters of Scotland and Ireland. Unlike the prehistoric pile dwellings around the Alps which were built on the shores and were inundated only later on, crannogs were built in the water, thus forming artificial islands. Crannogs were used as dwellings over five millennia, as late as the early 18th century.

A crannog is typically a partially or entirely artificial island, usually built in lakes, rivers and estuarine waters of Scotland and Ireland. Unlike the prehistoric pile dwellings around the Alps which were built on the shores and were inundated only later on, crannogs were built in the water, thus forming artificial islands. Crannogs were used as dwellings over five millennia, as late as the early 18th century.

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