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Nineveh was an ancient Assyrian city of Upper Mesopotamia, located on the outskirts of Mosul in modern-day northern Iraq. It is on the eastern bank of the Tigris River, and was the capital of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. It was the largest city in the world for some fifty years[1] until the year 612 BC when, after a bitter period of civil war in Assyria itself, it was sacked by a coalition of its former subject peoples.

Nineveh was an ancient Assyrian city of Upper Mesopotamia, located on the outskirts of Mosul in modern-day northern Iraq. It is on the eastern bank of the Tigris River, and was the capital of the Neo-Assyrian Empire. It was the largest city in the world for some fifty years[1] until the year 612 BC when, after a bitter period of civil war in Assyria itself, it was sacked by a coalition of its former subject peoples.

The Sumerians were the first known people to settle in Mesopotamia over 7,000 years ago, between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers (modern day Iraq). Sumer was often called the cradle of civilization. By the 4th millennium BC, it had established an advanced system writing, spectacular arts and architecture, astronomy and mathematics. The origin of the Sumerians remains a mystery till this day.

The Sumerians were the first known people to settle in Mesopotamia over 7,000 years ago, between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers (modern day Iraq). Sumer was often called the cradle of civilization. By the 4th millennium BC, it had established an advanced system writing, spectacular arts and architecture, astronomy and mathematics. The origin of the Sumerians remains a mystery till this day.

Discovery of giant head in Nimrud Palace, Iraq, from Illustrations of Monuments of Nineveh by Austen Henry Layard, drawing, 1849

Discovery of giant head in Nimrud Palace, Iraq, from Illustrations of Monuments of Nineveh by Austen Henry Layard, drawing, 1849

Recreación de la  famosa biblioteca de  Ashurbanipal II, del siglo VIII a. C.

Recreación de la famosa biblioteca de Ashurbanipal II, del siglo VIII a. C.

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