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Emperador Nerva, estatua romana (mármol), siglo 1 DC, (Museos Vaticanos, Ciudad del Vaticano).

Emperador Nerva, estatua romana (mármol), siglo 1 DC, (Museos Vaticanos, Ciudad del Vaticano).

Head from statue of Herakles (Hercules) Roman 117-188 CE from villa of the emperor Hadrian at Tivoli, Italy by mharrsch, via Flickr

Head from statue of Herakles (Hercules) Roman 117-188 CE from villa of the emperor Hadrian at Tivoli, Italy by mharrsch, via Flickr

This statue of Marcus Aurelius is not as ornamental as some of the other examples of the Roman Imperial style, but it is still breathtaking. Marcus Aurelius. 2006. Photograph. Capitoline Museum, Rome. Flickr. Yahoo!, 7 Sept. 2006. Web. 27 Sept. 2011.

This statue of Marcus Aurelius is not as ornamental as some of the other examples of the Roman Imperial style, but it is still breathtaking. Marcus Aurelius. 2006. Photograph. Capitoline Museum, Rome. Flickr. Yahoo!, 7 Sept. 2006. Web. 27 Sept. 2011.

Mattei Athena wearing a himation, 1st century AD Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original attributed to Cephisodotos or Euphranor, the Louvre

Mattei Athena wearing a himation, 1st century AD Roman copy of a 4th century BC Greek original attributed to Cephisodotos or Euphranor, the Louvre

Augustus, head of (colossal) Roman statue (marble), 1st century AD, (Musei Vaticani, Vatican City).

Augustus, head of (colossal) Roman statue (marble), 1st century AD, (Musei Vaticani, Vatican City).

Zeus (Jupiter)   Son of Cronos (Saturn) and Rhea. He defeated Cronos (Saturn) in a battle and then divided the realms with his brothers by lot, getting the heavens for his own. He was ruler and judge, the arbiter of disputes among Gods and men. His decisions were just and well balanced, showing no favoritism. He had several wives and many lover's, earning the title "all father" or "father god". His infidelity caused much strife on Olympos and in the world through he raging of his wife, Hera.

Zeus (Jupiter) Son of Cronos (Saturn) and Rhea. He defeated Cronos (Saturn) in a battle and then divided the realms with his brothers by lot, getting the heavens for his own. He was ruler and judge, the arbiter of disputes among Gods and men. His decisions were just and well balanced, showing no favoritism. He had several wives and many lover's, earning the title "all father" or "father god". His infidelity caused much strife on Olympos and in the world through he raging of his wife, Hera.

Statue of August from Prima Porta (close up). Marble. Ca. 20—17 BCE. Inv. No. 2290. Rome, Vatican Museums, Chiaramonti Museum, New wing, 14

Statue of August from Prima Porta (close up). Marble. Ca. 20—17 BCE. Inv. No. 2290. Rome, Vatican Museums, Chiaramonti Museum, New wing, 14

3rd C. BCE. A common image in ancient Greece of a shepherd carrying a sheep over his shoulders, continued in roman art. Later co-opted by early christians as a metaphorical image of Christ in mosaics. Marble. Vatican Museum.

3rd C. BCE. A common image in ancient Greece of a shepherd carrying a sheep over his shoulders, continued in roman art. Later co-opted by early christians as a metaphorical image of Christ in mosaics. Marble. Vatican Museum.

Tivoli: Marble bust of the emperor Hadrian wearing military dress From Hadrian’s Villa, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy AD 117-118 The British Museum This portrait bust was found at the Villa Adriana, the Roman emperor Hadrian’s magnificent country residence near Tivoli, outside Rome. >> Scopri le Offerte! im getting a replica of this when im rich because hadrian is the coolest guy ever.

Tivoli: Marble bust of the emperor Hadrian wearing military dress From Hadrian’s Villa, Tivoli, Lazio, Italy AD 117-118 The British Museum This portrait bust was found at the Villa Adriana, the Roman emperor Hadrian’s magnificent country residence near Tivoli, outside Rome. >> Scopri le Offerte! im getting a replica of this when im rich because hadrian is the coolest guy ever.

Marble statue of the Egyptian goddess holding a sistrum. Found in Tivoli, 117-138 CE. Rome, Palazzo Nuovo.

Marble statue of the Egyptian goddess holding a sistrum. Found in Tivoli, 117-138 CE. Rome, Palazzo Nuovo.

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