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Jabir Ibn Haiyan (722 – 804) Also known as Geber. The father of Arab chemistry known for his highly influential works on alchemy and metallurgy.

Jabir Ibn Haiyan (722 – 804) Also known as Geber. The father of Arab chemistry known for his highly influential works on alchemy and metallurgy.

Ibn Zuhr (1091 – 1161) Also known as Avenzoar. Arab physician and surgeon, known for his influential book Al-Taisir Fil-Mudawat Wal-Tadbeer (Book of Simplification Concerning Therapeutics and Diet).

Ibn Zuhr (1091 – 1161) Also known as Avenzoar. Arab physician and surgeon, known for his influential book Al-Taisir Fil-Mudawat Wal-Tadbeer (Book of Simplification Concerning Therapeutics and Diet).

Ibn Rushd (1126 – 1198) Also known as Averroes. Arab philosopher and scholar who produced a series of summaries and commentaries on most of Aristotle’s works and on Plato’s Republic.

Ibn Rushd (1126 – 1198) Also known as Averroes. Arab philosopher and scholar who produced a series of summaries and commentaries on most of Aristotle’s works and on Plato’s Republic.

The Astronomical Observatory of Nasir al-Din Tusi from a 15th century Persian manuscript

The Astronomical Observatory of Nasir al-Din Tusi from a 15th century Persian manuscript

Ibn Al-Baitar (1197 – 1248) Arab scientist, botanist and physician who systematically recorded the discoveries made by Islamic physicians in the Middle Ages.

Ibn Al-Baitar (1197 – 1248) Arab scientist, botanist and physician who systematically recorded the discoveries made by Islamic physicians in the Middle Ages.

Al-Farabi (c. 872[2] in Fārāb[3] – between 14 December, 950 and 12 January, 951 in Damascus), was a renowned scientist and philosopher of the Islamic Golden Age. He was also a cosmologist, logician, and musician.  Through his commentaries and treatises, Al-Farabi became well known among medieval Muslim intellectuals as The Second Teacher", that is, the successor to Aristotle, "The First Teacher".

Al-Farabi (c. 872[2] in Fārāb[3] – between 14 December, 950 and 12 January, 951 in Damascus), was a renowned scientist and philosopher of the Islamic Golden Age. He was also a cosmologist, logician, and musician. Through his commentaries and treatises, Al-Farabi became well known among medieval Muslim intellectuals as The Second Teacher", that is, the successor to Aristotle, "The First Teacher".

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