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Aprende lo Hermoso que es Adoptar un perro de la calle

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Aprende lo Hermoso que es Adoptar un perro de la calle

El ilustrador ruso Brid Born te dejará al borde de las lágrimas con esta enternecedora historieta basada en su experiencia adoptando un pero en refugio animal

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Aprende lo Hermoso que es Adoptar un perro de la calle

El ilustrador ruso Brid Born te dejará al borde de las lágrimas con esta enternecedora historieta basada en su experiencia adoptando un pero en refugio animal

#Affenpinscher: Has a fun-loving, sometimes mischievous, personality. Their small size makes them ideal for an apartment.

If the Characters in Downton Abbey Were Portrayed by Canine Actors, What Breeds Would They Be?

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Lateral view of a dog’s bone structure. Domestic dogs have been selectively bred for millennia for various behaviors, sensory capabilities, and physical attributes.[47] Modern dog breeds show more variation in size, appearance, and behavior than any other domestic animal. Nevertheless, their morphology is based on that of their wild wolf ancestors.[47] Dogs are predators and scavengers, and like many other predatory mammals, the dog has powerful muscles, fused wrist bones, a cardiovascular system that supports both sprinting and endurance, and teeth for catching and tearing. Dogs are highly variable in height and weight. The smallest known adult dog was a Yorkshire Terrier, that stood only 6.3 cm (2.5 in) at the shoulder, 9.5 cm (3.7 in) in length along the head-and-body, and weighed only 113 grams (4.0 oz). The largest known dog was an English Mastiff which weighed 155.6 kg (343 lb) and was 250 cm (98 in) from the snout to the tail.[92] The tallest dog is a Great Dane that stands 106.7 cm (42.0 in) at the shoulder.[93] Senses Vision Dog’s visual colour perception compared with humans. Like most mammals, dogs are dichromats and have color vision equivalent to red–green color blindness in humans (deuteranopia).[94][95][96][97] So, dogs can see blue and yellow, but have difficulty differentiating red and green because they only have two spectral types of cone photoreceptor, while normal humans have three. And dogs use color instead of brightness to differentiate light or dark blue/yellow.[98][99][100][101] Dogs are less sensitive to differences in grey shades than humans and also can detect brightness at about half the accuracy of humans.[102] The dog’s visual system has evolved to aid proficient hunting.[94] While a dog’s visual acuity is poor (that of a poodle’s has been estimated to translate to a Snellen rating of 20/75[94]), their visual discrimination for moving objects is very high; dogs have been shown to be able to discriminate between humans (e.g., identifying their human guardian) at a range of between 800 and 900 m, however this range decreases to 500–600 m if the object is stationary.[94] Dogs have a temporal resolution of between 60 and 70 Hz, which explains why many dogs struggle to watch television, as most such modern screens are optimized for humans at 50–60 Hz.[102] Dogs can detect a change in movement that exists in a single diopter of space within their eye. Humans, by comparison, require a change of between 10 and 20 diopters to detect movement.[103] As crepuscular hunters, dogs often rely on their vision in low light situations: They have very large pupils, a high density of rods in the fovea, an increased flicker rate, and a tapetum lucidum.[94] The tapetum is a reflective surface behind the retina that reflects light to give the photoreceptors a second chance to catch the photons. There is also a relationship between body size and overall diameter of the eye. A range of 9.5 and 11.6 mm can be found between various breeds of dogs. This 20% variance can be substantial and is associated as an adaptation toward superior night vision.[104] The eyes of different breeds of dogs have different shapes, dimensions, and retina configurations.[105] Many long-nosed breeds have a “visual streak”—a wide foveal region that runs across the width of the retina and gives them a very wide field of excellent vision. Some long-muzzled breeds, in particular, the sighthounds, have a field of vision up to 270° (compared to 180° for humans). Short-nosed breeds, on the other hand, have an “area centralis”: a central patch with up to three times the density of nerve endings as the visual streak, giving them detailed sight much more like a human’s. Some broad-headed breeds with short noses have a field of vision similar to that of humans.[95][96] Most breeds have good vision, but some show a genetic predisposition for myopia – such as Rottweilers, with which one out of every two has been found to be myopic.[94] Dogs also have a greater divergence of the eye axis than humans, enabling them to rotate their pupils farther in any direction. The divergence of the eye axis of dogs ranges from 12–25° depending on the breed.[103] Experimentation has proven that dogs can distinguish between complex visual images such as that of a cube or a prism. Dogs also show attraction to static visual images such as the silhouette of a dog on a screen, their own reflections, or videos of dogs; however, their interest declines sharply once they are unable to make social contact with the image.[106] Hearing The physiology of a dog ear. Transformation of the ears of a huskamute puppy in 6 days The frequency range of dog hearing is approximately 40 Hz to 60,000 Hz,[107] which means that dogs can detect sounds far beyond the upper limit of the human auditory spectrum.[96][107][108] In addition, dogs have ear mobility, which allows them to rapidly pinpoint the exact location of a sound.[109] Eighteen or more muscles can tilt, rotate, raise, or lower a dog’s ear. A dog can identify a sound’s location much faster than a human can, as well as hear sounds at four times the distance.[109] Smell The wet, textured nose of a dog While the human brain is dominated by a large visual cortex, the dog brain is dominated by an olfactory cortex.[94] The olfactory bulb in dogs is roughly forty times bigger than the olfactory bulb in humans, relative to total brain size, with 125 to 220 million smell-sensitive receptors.[94] The bloodhound exceeds this standard with nearly 300 million receptors.[94] Consequently, it has been estimated that dogs, in general, have an olfactory sense ranging from one hundred thousand to one million times more sensitive than a human’s. In some dog breeds, such as bloodhounds, the olfactory sense may be up to 100 million times greater than a human’s.[110] The wet nose, or rhinarium, is essential for determining the direction of the air current containing the smell. Cold receptors in the skin are sensitive to the cooling of the skin by evaporation of the moisture by air currents.[111] Physical characteristics Main article: Dog anatomy Coat Main article: Coat (dog) A heavy winter coat with countershading in a mixed-breed dog The coats of domestic dogs are of two varieties: “double” being common with dogs (as well as wolves) originating from colder climates, made up of a coarse guard hair and a soft down hair, or “single”, with the topcoat only. Domestic dogs often display the remnants of countershading, a common natural camouflage pattern. A countershaded animal will have dark coloring on its upper surfaces and light coloring below,[112] which reduces its general visibility. Thus, many breeds will have an occasional “blaze”, stripe, or “star” of white fur on their chest or underside.[113] Tail See also: Docking There are many different shapes for dog tails: straight, straight up, sickle, curled, or cork-screw. As with many canids, one of the primary functions of a dog’s tail is to communicate their emotional state, which can be important in getting along with others. In some hunting dogs, however, the tail is traditionally docked to avoid injuries.[114] In some breeds, such as the Braque du Bourbonnais, puppies can be born with a short tail or no tail at all.[115]

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The Scoop: Lauren Gregg, Reggie and Charles

Image Detail for - ... on the Streets to Stay with Companion Animals | Change.org News..."Do not judge by appearances, a rich heart may be under a poor coat".

Cesar Milan, the dog whisperer, recently adopted a greyhound called Argos from a man who had rescued him from hunters in Spain. He had a broken leg which is now healing well with daily therapy. Argos has become a valued member of Cesar’s “pack”.

Brussels Griffon- As Good as it Gets brought this dog to the public eye. It came close to competing with Jack Nicholson, not a common feat.