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Crédito: Wiki Commons

Crédito: Wiki Commons

Nesher Ramla, Israel, an open-air site located in an interesting geological landscape, which has presented archaeologists with a rather special treasure trove of zooarchaeological and lithic deposits. The karstic landscape in which this site is situated, has numerous depressions characteristic of chemically eroded carbonate rocks. An 8m thick depression at the site revealed a collection of stone tools and animal remains.

Nesher Ramla, Israel, an open-air site located in an interesting geological landscape, which has presented archaeologists with a rather special treasure trove of zooarchaeological and lithic deposits. The karstic landscape in which this site is situated, has numerous depressions characteristic of chemically eroded carbonate rocks. An 8m thick depression at the site revealed a collection of stone tools and animal remains.

Location of the study sites and Neanderthal cultures: Mousterian of Acheulean Tradition, MTA, Keilmessergruppen, KMG, and transitional - Mousterian with Bifacial Tools, MBT (Karen Ruebens)

Location of the study sites and Neanderthal cultures: Mousterian of Acheulean Tradition, MTA, Keilmessergruppen, KMG, and transitional - Mousterian with Bifacial Tools, MBT (Karen Ruebens)

The distribution of Red Hair in Europe - This diagram shows the distribution of Red hair in Europe.  As you can see it is a patchy distribution, with high frequency in Ireland, Scotland and Wales with another large patch of high-frequency phenotypes in Russia.

The distribution of Red Hair in Europe - This diagram shows the distribution of Red hair in Europe. As you can see it is a patchy distribution, with high frequency in Ireland, Scotland and Wales with another large patch of high-frequency phenotypes in Russia.

Tell el-Amarna, Egypt A balloon view of the excavation at the stele site at the…

Tell el-Amarna, Egypt A balloon view of the excavation at the stele site at the…

Major sites of austrolopithicine finds

Major sites of austrolopithicine finds

Choirokoitia (sometimes spelled Khirokitia) (Greek: Χοιροκοιτία) is an archaeological site on the island of Cyprus, not far from Limassol, dating from the Neolithic age 7000 b.C. It has been listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1998.

Choirokoitia (sometimes spelled Khirokitia) (Greek: Χοιροκοιτία) is an archaeological site on the island of Cyprus, not far from Limassol, dating from the Neolithic age 7000 b.C. It has been listed as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO since 1998.

Subsequent excavations and studies have revealed that ancient humans were present 16,000 or more years ago, some two to three thousand years earlier than previously allowed by textbooks. Known as the Topper Site, it appears to be one of several sites in the eastern U.S. producing evidence that humans were living in the western hemisphere during the last Ice Age.

Subsequent excavations and studies have revealed that ancient humans were present 16,000 or more years ago, some two to three thousand years earlier than previously allowed by textbooks. Known as the Topper Site, it appears to be one of several sites in the eastern U.S. producing evidence that humans were living in the western hemisphere during the last Ice Age.

Guzana. ca 7000-6000 BC Halaf pottery is remarkable for the quality of its production. As a result, it often survives at sites even though thin walled. Created long before the invention of the potter's wheel & refined glazes. Tel Halaf bowl fragment with rim. Syria

Guzana. ca 7000-6000 BC Halaf pottery is remarkable for the quality of its production. As a result, it often survives at sites even though thin walled. Created long before the invention of the potter's wheel & refined glazes. Tel Halaf bowl fragment with rim. Syria

Vinca culture - Neolithic figurine shows a girl in a short skirt and ornate top, found in the Plocnik archaeological site near the town of Prokuplje in southern Serbia, November 3, 2007. Recent excavations at the site -- part of the Vinca culture which was Europe's biggest prehistoric civilisation -- point to a metropolis with a great degree of sophistication and a taste for art and fashion. REUTERS-Stevan Lazarevic

Vinca culture - Neolithic figurine shows a girl in a short skirt and ornate top, found in the Plocnik archaeological site near the town of Prokuplje in southern Serbia, November 3, 2007. Recent excavations at the site -- part of the Vinca culture which was Europe's biggest prehistoric civilisation -- point to a metropolis with a great degree of sophistication and a taste for art and fashion. REUTERS-Stevan Lazarevic

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