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mascaras mexicanas - Buscar con Google

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STUNNING ~ Papua New Guinea Carved Tribal Wall Mask w/Alligator in Mouth & Tusk

STUNNING ~ Papua New Guinea Carved Tribal Wall Mask w/Alligator in Mouth & Tusk

Great collection of image examples of Mexican (and other) Mache Masks. Pratie Place: August 2009

Great collection of image examples of Mexican (and other) Mache Masks. Pratie Place: August 2009

Condor Mask. Bolivia, South America. Frabricated tin. If this Bolivian condor mask was intended for dance or parade it would be painted. Some tourists and collectors prefer the raw metal look these wonderful pieces of sculpture have before the application of colored paints and glitter. Probably middle to late 20th century because of the high level of craftsmanship.

Condor Mask. Bolivia, South America. Frabricated tin. If this Bolivian condor mask was intended for dance or parade it would be painted. Some tourists and collectors prefer the raw metal look these wonderful pieces of sculpture have before the application of colored paints and glitter. Probably middle to late 20th century because of the high level of craftsmanship.

Máscara de Oaxaca, México.

Máscara de Oaxaca, México.

Awesome Mexican Mask from the Mexic-Art Museum in Austin, TX

Awesome Mexican Mask from the Mexic-Art Museum in Austin, TX

Mexican Masks - Old Hermitano mask, Michoacan, Mexico

Mexican Masks - Old Hermitano mask, Michoacan, Mexico

Tigre mask  Guerrero    8 inches, painted    Throughout Mexico one finds dances about fearsome man-eating jaguars, which may be holdovers from before the Spanish conquest. In preColumbian traditions these dances had the purpose of petitioning the jaguar god, the lord of all animals, so that he would permit successful hunting for the villagers. As a result of this historical-cultural background, the jaguar symbol became amalgamated or confused with that of the tiger, which is why these days…

Tigre mask Guerrero 8 inches, painted Throughout Mexico one finds dances about fearsome man-eating jaguars, which may be holdovers from before the Spanish conquest. In preColumbian traditions these dances had the purpose of petitioning the jaguar god, the lord of all animals, so that he would permit successful hunting for the villagers. As a result of this historical-cultural background, the jaguar symbol became amalgamated or confused with that of the tiger, which is why these days…

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