Hildegard Raven- van der Heijden

Hildegard Raven- van der Heijden

Hildegard Raven- van der Heijden
Más ideas de Hildegard
Tablet weaving loom.

Tablet weaving loom.

Tablet weaving , an epic story - FIBER ARTS

Tablet weaving , an epic story - FIBER ARTS

Sculptures made from natural river stones with rattan woven in Japanese basketry techniques by Seattle area artist Del Webber (stone sculptures vary in size, approximately 4" x 2" x 1.25" up to 4.5" x 3" x 2.5")

Sculptures made from natural river stones with rattan woven in Japanese basketry techniques by Seattle area artist Del Webber (stone sculptures vary in size, approximately 4" x 2" x 1.25" up to 4.5" x 3" x 2.5")

joanne russo: contemporary baskets and sculpture

joanne russo: contemporary baskets and sculpture

Crochet: puff stitch butterflies! Beautiful and easy :)

Crochet: puff stitch butterflies! Beautiful and easy :)

Красивая декоративная подушечка крючком - Сам себе волшебник ÕPETUS: http://sam-sebe-volshebnik.moya-kopilochka.ru/krasivaya-dekorativnaya-podushechka-kryuchkom/

Красивая декоративная подушечка крючком - Сам себе волшебник ÕPETUS: http://sam-sebe-volshebnik.moya-kopilochka.ru/krasivaya-dekorativnaya-podushechka-kryuchkom/

painted sticks

painted sticks

Montana Blue Heron Marilyn Evans and Wm. Stevens

Montana Blue Heron Marilyn Evans and Wm. Stevens

The karakumidai is used for making twined braids constructed of diamond shapes. The braid was developed during the Heian period (794 to 1192) and marked the creation of the first truly Japanese braids rather than reproductions of Chinese and Korean techniques that had been seen up to that time. A sash called hirao were made for imperial formal court occasions and ceremonial Bugaku and Shinto dance costumes, still seen today. The braids are very complicated to make.

The karakumidai is used for making twined braids constructed of diamond shapes. The braid was developed during the Heian period (794 to 1192) and marked the creation of the first truly Japanese braids rather than reproductions of Chinese and Korean techniques that had been seen up to that time. A sash called hirao were made for imperial formal court occasions and ceremonial Bugaku and Shinto dance costumes, still seen today. The braids are very complicated to make.

Simple, cheap (under $10) but beautiful cardweaving loom.

Simple, cheap (under $10) but beautiful cardweaving loom.