This was described by the original pinner as "Tattoo designs" but I rather fancy it as a piece of jewelry, most likely a broach.

This was described by the original pinner as "Tattoo designs" but I rather fancy it as a piece of jewelry, most likely a broach.

Cuitláhuac, 10th tlatoani of the Aztec Empire, brother of Moctezuma II. After being held captive by the Aztecs, Cortés ordered Moctezuma to ask his people stop fighting. Moctezuma told him that they wouldn't listen to him, and in turn asked him to free his brother Cuitláhuac so he'd convince the people to stop. Once freed, Cuitláhuac led his people against the conquistadors and successfully drove them out of Tenochtitlán on June 30, 1520. After ruling for only 80 days, he died of smallpox.

Cuitláhuac, 10th tlatoani of the Aztec Empire, brother of Moctezuma II. After being held captive by the Aztecs, Cortés ordered Moctezuma to ask his people stop fighting. Moctezuma told him that they wouldn't listen to him, and in turn asked him to free his brother Cuitláhuac so he'd convince the people to stop. Once freed, Cuitláhuac led his people against the conquistadors and successfully drove them out of Tenochtitlán on June 30, 1520. After ruling for only 80 days, he died of smallpox.

His costume is unlike that seen in any other Mesoamerican portrayals and his expression, even though partially obscured by the eye rings that some scholars connect with the Aztec Rain God Tlaloc, radiates a sense of quiet, internalized contemplation. Is he human, perhaps a young lord, or is he a god? (Height: 47 cm.) Photograph by Antonio Vizcaíno, published in Museo de Antropología de Xalapa, Xalapa, Veracruz, México, 1988.   Seated male sculpture

His costume is unlike that seen in any other Mesoamerican portrayals and his expression, even though partially obscured by the eye rings that some scholars connect with the Aztec Rain God Tlaloc, radiates a sense of quiet, internalized contemplation. Is he human, perhaps a young lord, or is he a god? (Height: 47 cm.) Photograph by Antonio Vizcaíno, published in Museo de Antropología de Xalapa, Xalapa, Veracruz, México, 1988. Seated male sculpture

Coyote, Aztec, stone, 38 by 17 by 13 centimeters, circa 1500 A.D., Museo Nacional de Antropologia, INAH, Mexico City

Coyote, Aztec, stone, 38 by 17 by 13 centimeters, circa 1500 A.D., Museo Nacional de Antropologia, INAH, Mexico City

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