Pancho Villa y Emiliano Zapata, 20 de noviembre, día de la Revolución Mexicana

Pancho Villa y Emiliano Zapata, 20 de noviembre, día de la Revolución Mexicana

Pancho Villa and his sister, and papa

Pancho Villa and his sister, and papa

“Quiero morir siendo esclavo de los principios, no de los hombres.” Emiliano Zapata, Mexico

“Quiero morir siendo esclavo de los principios, no de los hombres.” Emiliano Zapata, Mexico

General Francisco Villa, Mexico

General Francisco Villa, Mexico

General Pancho Villa. El Centauro del Nor

General Pancho Villa. El Centauro del Nor

16 de septiembre de 1906, México, D.F.

16 de septiembre de 1906, México, D.F.

Zapata Charro suit.

Zapata Charro suit.

Francisco "Pancho" Villa

Francisco "Pancho" Villa

Pancho Villa - Following guerilla leader Pancho Villa’s raid on Columbus, New Mexico (in which 16 Americans died), President Wilson sent Gen. “Blackjack” Pershing and 10,000 soldiers into the mountains of northern Mexico to hunt Villa down. The mission ultimately failed but Mexicans viewed the act as an unjust invasion. It is said that the pejorative designation “gringo” came from this time, as US soldiers clad in olive uniforms were met with cries of “Green, Go!”

Pancho Villa - Following guerilla leader Pancho Villa’s raid on Columbus, New Mexico (in which 16 Americans died), President Wilson sent Gen. “Blackjack” Pershing and 10,000 soldiers into the mountains of northern Mexico to hunt Villa down. The mission ultimately failed but Mexicans viewed the act as an unjust invasion. It is said that the pejorative designation “gringo” came from this time, as US soldiers clad in olive uniforms were met with cries of “Green, Go!”

Serapes began as masculine attire, with the Mexican serape serving as a common garment worn by people of all lifestyles; woven serapes were traditionally worn by the lower classes, while cotton and dyes were considered luxury garments. Pancho Villa wore one!

Serapes began as masculine attire, with the Mexican serape serving as a common garment worn by people of all lifestyles; woven serapes were traditionally worn by the lower classes, while cotton and dyes were considered luxury garments. Pancho Villa wore one!

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