We thought you’d enjoy seeing a street side view of one of our artist’s workshop in Santa Clara del Cobre. As you walk through the cobbled streets of the village you can hear the “tap-tap-tap” from dozens of hammers – it seems as though every third house has a workshop close by. The shops are usually open air structures made of wood with corrugated metal roofs.

We thought you’d enjoy seeing a street side view of one of our artist’s workshop in Santa Clara del Cobre. As you walk through the cobbled streets of the village you can hear the “tap-tap-tap” from dozens of hammers – it seems as though every third house has a workshop close by. The shops are usually open air structures made of wood with corrugated metal roofs.

We thought you’d enjoy seeing a street side view of one of our artist’s workshop in Santa Clara del Cobre. As you walk through the cobbled streets of the village you can hear the “tap-tap-tap” from dozens of hammers – it seems as though every third house has a workshop close by. The shops are usually open air structures made of wood with corrugated metal roofs.

We thought you’d enjoy seeing a street side view of one of our artist’s workshop in Santa Clara del Cobre. As you walk through the cobbled streets of the village you can hear the “tap-tap-tap” from dozens of hammers – it seems as though every third house has a workshop close by. The shops are usually open air structures made of wood with corrugated metal roofs.

The Posada Basilica     This is a photo we took just down the hill from where we stay in Patzcuaro, The Posada Basilica. The Posada is actually a home that was built in the 19th century and converted a number of years ago to a small hotel. The street in this photo is a typical scene in Patzcuaro (which is 20” from the village where our artists live) with the cobbled streets and the local people going about their daily activities, not paying much attention to the “touristos”.

The Posada Basilica This is a photo we took just down the hill from where we stay in Patzcuaro, The Posada Basilica. The Posada is actually a home that was built in the 19th century and converted a number of years ago to a small hotel. The street in this photo is a typical scene in Patzcuaro (which is 20” from the village where our artists live) with the cobbled streets and the local people going about their daily activities, not paying much attention to the “touristos”.

The third week of every August since the late 1940’s our village Santa Clara del Cobre hosts a “Concourso” (contest) and many of the coppersmiths submit a masterpiece hoping to win a prize and recognition for their talent. This picture was taken several years ago during the Concourso and I’m standing by a sample of a large cazo (handled bowl), a design that has become the village’s signature piece

The third week of every August since the late 1940’s our village Santa Clara del Cobre hosts a “Concourso” (contest) and many of the coppersmiths submit a masterpiece hoping to win a prize and recognition for their talent. This picture was taken several years ago during the Concourso and I’m standing by a sample of a large cazo (handled bowl), a design that has become the village’s signature piece

Wildflowers in Patzcuaro    This picture was taken a few summers ago in late August. The drive from the village where we stay, Patzcuaro, to the artists’ village is a pleasant 15 minute drive through the forest. We passed this clearing and I couldn’t resist this field of wildflowers – some were taller than me! Summertime is the rainy season in Michoacan so by summer’s end there are flowers everywhere. What a beautiful time of the year it is!

Wildflowers in Patzcuaro This picture was taken a few summers ago in late August. The drive from the village where we stay, Patzcuaro, to the artists’ village is a pleasant 15 minute drive through the forest. We passed this clearing and I couldn’t resist this field of wildflowers – some were taller than me! Summertime is the rainy season in Michoacan so by summer’s end there are flowers everywhere. What a beautiful time of the year it is!

This is the little church in our artists’ village on a warm, sunny April day. Even the tiniest villages will have a small church built when the Catholic Church was pioneering the New World, a couple of centuries ago. The Church built where there were existing Indian populations and it’s always a surprise to see these elaborate structures in what are even today remote and isolated locations.

This is the little church in our artists’ village on a warm, sunny April day. Even the tiniest villages will have a small church built when the Catholic Church was pioneering the New World, a couple of centuries ago. The Church built where there were existing Indian populations and it’s always a surprise to see these elaborate structures in what are even today remote and isolated locations.

When we started the copper business in 1994 it began in my living room. When we ran out of floor space we moved it to two 8’ x 10’ rooms in the basement. Here you can see all our “copper babies” lined up on steel shelves that we purchased from a liquidating company in town. We did all our packing and shipping in these two rooms too – it was pretty tight! Later that year we finally “grew up” a bit and leased a small warehouse space in town.

When we started the copper business in 1994 it began in my living room. When we ran out of floor space we moved it to two 8’ x 10’ rooms in the basement. Here you can see all our “copper babies” lined up on steel shelves that we purchased from a liquidating company in town. We did all our packing and shipping in these two rooms too – it was pretty tight! Later that year we finally “grew up” a bit and leased a small warehouse space in town.

This is a typical street scene just down the hill from our hotel in Patzcuaro. The Spanish Colonial influence is everywhere in this old part of the village and many of the buildings are 200+ years old.  Many of the families that built these homes later moved to what became the capital of the state, Morelia, because of the frequent earthquakes. This is volcano country after all and the locals take the tremors in stride.

This is a typical street scene just down the hill from our hotel in Patzcuaro. The Spanish Colonial influence is everywhere in this old part of the village and many of the buildings are 200+ years old. Many of the families that built these homes later moved to what became the capital of the state, Morelia, because of the frequent earthquakes. This is volcano country after all and the locals take the tremors in stride.

We traveled to the state of Guanajuato just north of Michoacan and were introduced to some potters in Santa Rosa de Lima, a little village in the mountains about an hour from the capital of that state, literally in the middle of nowhere! These people did magnificent work in the old world tradition of hand-throwing all their pottery using a “kick wheel” – no electricity! After the pot is thrown it is set out in the intense sun to dry, then fired, hand painted, and fired again.

We traveled to the state of Guanajuato just north of Michoacan and were introduced to some potters in Santa Rosa de Lima, a little village in the mountains about an hour from the capital of that state, literally in the middle of nowhere! These people did magnificent work in the old world tradition of hand-throwing all their pottery using a “kick wheel” – no electricity! After the pot is thrown it is set out in the intense sun to dry, then fired, hand painted, and fired again.

Lake Patzcuaro is the lake near our artists’ village – the second largest lake in Mexico.  There are a number of islands in the lake where the Indian people still live. There are no cars on these islands; just foot paths for the people and their animals. How sweet this place is. If you go out early in the morning or late in the day you can still see the Indian people fishing or gathering tule reeds which they dry and then weave into mats or baskets. This place is so charming – I just love…

Lake Patzcuaro is the lake near our artists’ village – the second largest lake in Mexico. There are a number of islands in the lake where the Indian people still live. There are no cars on these islands; just foot paths for the people and their animals. How sweet this place is. If you go out early in the morning or late in the day you can still see the Indian people fishing or gathering tule reeds which they dry and then weave into mats or baskets. This place is so charming – I just love…


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