Ander Arroitajauregi

Ander Arroitajauregi

Ander Arroitajauregi
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Sara Ruiz: «La viola da gamba suena en redondo»

Sara Ruiz: «La viola da gamba suena en redondo»

Young woman pl. the viola d'amore, Johann Kupezki (1667-1740), hungarian

Young woman pl. the viola d'amore, Johann Kupezki (1667-1740), hungarian

Young woman pl. the viola d'amore, Johann Kupezki (1667-1740), hungarian

Young woman pl. the viola d'amore, Johann Kupezki (1667-1740), hungarian

Viola da gamba at the Koffler Center for the Arts

Viola da gamba at the Koffler Center for the Arts

Bass viol, 1733. Sweden. | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Bass viol, 1733. Sweden. | Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

A photograph of Christian Döbereiner, examining a baryton in the museum in Munich. In addition to championing the viol in Germany and the USA, Mr. Döbereiner also authored one of the first tutors for playing on the viol da gamba, which was published very early into the 20th C. He edited a substantial number of works for the viola da gamba and for the baryton.

A photograph of Christian Döbereiner, examining a baryton in the museum in Munich. In addition to championing the viol in Germany and the USA, Mr. Döbereiner also authored one of the first tutors for playing on the viol da gamba, which was published very early into the 20th C. He edited a substantial number of works for the viola da gamba and for the baryton.

Baryton 19 strings (Deutsches Museum)

Baryton 19 strings (Deutsches Museum)

Baryton

Baryton

The Baryton is a bowed string instrument which shares some characteristics with instruments of the viol family,[1] distinguished by an extra set of plucked strings. It was in regular use in Europe up until the end of the 18th century. - Baryton by Ferdinand Wilhelm Jaura, 1934 after Simon Schodler, 1782

The Baryton is a bowed string instrument which shares some characteristics with instruments of the viol family,[1] distinguished by an extra set of plucked strings. It was in regular use in Europe up until the end of the 18th century. - Baryton by Ferdinand Wilhelm Jaura, 1934 after Simon Schodler, 1782

The baryton differs from the bass viol in having an additional set of wire strings. These perform two functions: they vibrate sympathetically with the bowed strings, enriching the tone, and they can also be plucked by the left thumb of the performer, creating a contrasting tonal quality. As can be seen in the illustration, the bowed strings are placed on the right, where they can be easily fingered by the player's left hand. The plucked strings are on the left; they were reachable by the…

The baryton differs from the bass viol in having an additional set of wire strings. These perform two functions: they vibrate sympathetically with the bowed strings, enriching the tone, and they can also be plucked by the left thumb of the performer, creating a contrasting tonal quality. As can be seen in the illustration, the bowed strings are placed on the right, where they can be easily fingered by the player's left hand. The plucked strings are on the left; they were reachable by the…