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#3134 Adjustable Tenoning Jig Plans - Joinery

#3134 Adjustable Tenoning Jig Plans - Joinery

#3134 Adjustable Tenoning Jig Plans - Joinery

#3134 Adjustable Tenoning Jig Plans - Joinery

Advanced Tenon Jig Plans - Joinery Tips, Jigs and Techniques | WoodArchivist.com

Advanced Tenon Jig Plans - Joinery Tips, Jigs and Techniques | WoodArchivist.com

Solución enzimática casera para la floración de orquídeas || Orquiplanet - YouTube

Solución enzimática casera para la floración de orquídeas || Orquiplanet - YouTube

Tío luis

Tío luis

Benten mie-kikkō 弁天三重亀甲 This is another of the benten patterns. As with all the other patterns, I first cut the mitsu-kude joints, then the 90° half-lap joints. For this pattern, there are three half-lap joints between each of the mitsu-kude joints (top left photo). After all the joints have been cut, I assemble the jigumi (top right). Next, I cut and insert the short hexagon pieces (centre left). Once all the hexagon pieces have been fitted, I cut and insert the triangle pieces (centre…

Benten mie-kikkō 弁天三重亀甲 This is another of the benten patterns. As with all the other patterns, I first cut the mitsu-kude joints, then the 90° half-lap joints. For this pattern, there are three half-lap joints between each of the mitsu-kude joints (top left photo). After all the joints have been cut, I assemble the jigumi (top right). Next, I cut and insert the short hexagon pieces (centre left). Once all the hexagon pieces have been fitted, I cut and insert the triangle pieces (centre…

Square goma-gara 真矩胡麻殼 The goma-gara (sesame pattern) is, along with the kiri (paulownia), perhaps among the more difficult of the square kumiko patterns, and accuracy is critical to avoid the heartbreaking sound of snapping kumiko. It features an attractive eight-pointed sesame flower shape in the centre of each pattern. First, I cut and assemble the jigumi (top left photo). Next are four main diagonal pieces for each pattern (top right). Once the main diagonals are in, I begin cutting…

Square goma-gara 真矩胡麻殼 The goma-gara (sesame pattern) is, along with the kiri (paulownia), perhaps among the more difficult of the square kumiko patterns, and accuracy is critical to avoid the heartbreaking sound of snapping kumiko. It features an attractive eight-pointed sesame flower shape in the centre of each pattern. First, I cut and assemble the jigumi (top left photo). Next are four main diagonal pieces for each pattern (top right). Once the main diagonals are in, I begin cutting…

Shokkō 蜀江 The next pattern is the shokkō, and this forms the basis of all the other shokkō patterns. It is similar to the tsuno shokkō without the extensions (horns), but in this design, the internal patterns are rectangles instead of squares. The jigumi also forms rectangles, so this makes cutting the jaguchi joints on the locking pieces a bit of a challenge. First, though, I cut and assemble the jigumi (top left). Next, as always, I cut and insert first the horizontal pattern pieces (top…

Shokkō 蜀江 The next pattern is the shokkō, and this forms the basis of all the other shokkō patterns. It is similar to the tsuno shokkō without the extensions (horns), but in this design, the internal patterns are rectangles instead of squares. The jigumi also forms rectangles, so this makes cutting the jaguchi joints on the locking pieces a bit of a challenge. First, though, I cut and assemble the jigumi (top left). Next, as always, I cut and insert first the horizontal pattern pieces (top…

Futae kaku-shokkō 二重角蜀江 Yet another shokkō pattern—this time the futae kaku-shokkō. It’s a fairly straightforward pattern, and what you see is what you get. The main difficulty is cutting the jaguchi locking pieces to length, but this becomes easier with practice. As with all the other patterns, first I cut and assemble the jigumi (top left). Next, I insert the sets of internal rectangles, first the horizontal pieces (top right and centre left), then the vertical pieces (centre right). Once…

Futae kaku-shokkō 二重角蜀江 Yet another shokkō pattern—this time the futae kaku-shokkō. It’s a fairly straightforward pattern, and what you see is what you get. The main difficulty is cutting the jaguchi locking pieces to length, but this becomes easier with practice. As with all the other patterns, first I cut and assemble the jigumi (top left). Next, I insert the sets of internal rectangles, first the horizontal pieces (top right and centre left), then the vertical pieces (centre right). Once…

Yae shokkō 八重蜀江 Back to the shokkō patterns, and this one is the yae shokkō. This is essentially the same pattern as the previous yae tsuno-shokkō, except the internal squares are formed with mitre joints rather than half-lap joints with extensions, and the locking pieces are connected to the corners with jaguchi joints. In this design, the jigumi is exactly the same as the yae tsuno-shokkō. So after assembling the jigumi, the first step is to cut the internal squares. As with most of the…

Yae shokkō 八重蜀江 Back to the shokkō patterns, and this one is the yae shokkō. This is essentially the same pattern as the previous yae tsuno-shokkō, except the internal squares are formed with mitre joints rather than half-lap joints with extensions, and the locking pieces are connected to the corners with jaguchi joints. In this design, the jigumi is exactly the same as the yae tsuno-shokkō. So after assembling the jigumi, the first step is to cut the internal squares. As with most of the…